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Content: Volume 4, Issue 2

showing 1-6 of 16 breaks

Probing the evolution of photosynthetic life on the early Earth

In a famous cartoon, a fish morphs slowly into a human as it forsakes water for dry land. With sly humor, this doodle actually captures a pervasive narrative of evolutionary history: the oceans are life's cradle, with life gaining the continents only later. Seemingly, the... click to read more

  • Andrew H. Knoll | Professor at Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Views 66
Reading time 3 min
published on Jun 19, 2018
Environmental sustainability of nationally recommended diets

It has long been understood that what we eat impacts not only our health, but our environment too. Despite this food-sustainability awareness, very few national dietary recommendations (NRD) make any consideration of sustainability. For example, the USDA's Dietary Guidelines for Americans has a lot of... click to read more

  • Paul Behrens | Assistant Professor at LUC The Hague & Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, Netherlands
Views 126
Reading time 3 min
published on Jun 14, 2018
How babies learn what we want

When someone reaches on tiptoes for the cookie jar, ignoring the baby carrots on her plate, we see more than a literal act of reaching: We understand the beliefs, desires, and motivations that lead to the action in the first place. Research from developmental psychology... click to read more

  • Shari Liu | PhD student at Lab For Developmental Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA
Views 135
Reading time 3 min
published on Jun 12, 2018
Evolution does not care

Cells form the biological unit of all living organisms. But, like organisms, cells go through a life cycle: new cells emerge after cell division, they live, they age and they die. In some cases cell death is necessary for the organism's development and life. However,... click to read more

  • Thomas Wilhelm | PhD student at Institute of Molecular Biology, Ackermannweg 4 55128 Mainz, Germany
  • Holger Richly | Professor at Institute of Molecular Biology, Ackermannweg 4 55128 Mainz, Germany
Views 190
Reading time 4 min
published on Jun 7, 2018
Microscopic Body-Snatchers Infest Our Oceans

Recently we have found that our oceans are full of microscopic "body-snatchers" that are important members of the ocean's food-web. The base of marine ecology rests upon the microscopic plankton. The origin of the term plankton is from the Greek word πλαγκτός meaning "I drift (myself)".... click to read more

  • Aditee Mitra | Senior Lecturer at Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, Wales, UK
Views 158
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jun 5, 2018
An exoplanet with glowing water reveals its nature

Space-based observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope are providing valuable insights into the atmospheres of planets outside our solar system, known as "exoplanets". We have recently used Hubble to uncover the most compelling evidence to date for a stratosphere layer on one such exoplanet,... click to read more

  • Tom Evans | Research Fellow at College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom
Views 227
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 24, 2018