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antimicrobial resistance

number of breaks: 12

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Insect microbiomes – a new hope against antimicrobial resistance?

Nowadays, more and more antibiotics (also referred to as antimicrobial drugs) are becoming ineffective to fight against bad bacteria and fungi because these organisms are capable of rapidly developing resistance to those compounds. These resistances arise due to the misuse and overuse of antibiotics. In... click to read more

  • Fabio Palmieri | PhD student at University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland
Views 566
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Aug 2, 2019
Sleeping bacteria survive antibiotic treatment and hijack the host immune system

Since the 1940s, it has become easier to treat bacterial infections due to the discovery of antibiotics. These drugs work by corrupting active processes in bacteria, such as the ability to make DNA or proteins. By taking antibiotics when we are infected, we kill most... click to read more

  • Daphne Stapels | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Imperial College London, London, UK
  • Peter Hill | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Imperial College London, London, UK
Views 1011
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 6, 2019
New and Improved! A supercharged antibiotic to fight superbugs

Have you taken an antibiotic lately? You're not alone. Almost one in two people will have been dosed with an antibiotic over the last year. Unfortunately, all this antibiotic use is causing the bacteria to become more and more resistant to the drug's effects. We... click to read more

  • Mark A. T. Blaskovich | Senior Research Officer at Centre for Superbug Solutions, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane Qld 4072, Australia
Views 1559
Reading time 4.5 min
published on Nov 9, 2018
Bacteria under stress: cheating to survive

As scientists, we often think of bacteria as free-swimming, lone cells, growing in test tubes. Indeed, the majority of experiments are performed in this kind of environment. However, in reality, bacteria often grow in groups of cells, attached to surfaces. These cellular communities are social;... click to read more

  • Isabel Frost | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at The Center For Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy, Washington, DC, USA
Views 1332
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 15, 2018
Absent microbial teachers and immunological hooliganism

The trillions of microbes that live in our gastrointestinal tract are known as the gut microbiome. It is an "acquired organ" of the body that is essential for the development of immune and metabolic systems and for nutrient digestion and absorption, among other things. As... click to read more

  • Jun Miyoshi | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery (KCBD), The University of Chicago, Chicago, USA
  • Eugene Chang | Professor at Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery (KCBD), The University of Chicago, Chicago, USA
Views 1365
Reading time 4 min
published on Sep 26, 2018